When you’re up high in the sky and you witness a tyke having an asthma assault with not a single solution to be found, what are you going to do? Make a temporary nebulizer the McGyver way, obviously.

This was the situation confronted by robotic surgery Dr. Khurshid Guru when he was on Air Canada flight from Spain on the way to the US. Khurshid, who went to a therapeutic meeting in Spain, was returning home on board the transoceanic flight when the occurrence happened. They flew four hours from the total of seven-hour flight when he heard that a baby was experiencing an asthma assault with no access to medication, since the guardians erroneously put the medicine in their checked luggage. In spite of the fact that he generally didn’t deal with youthful patients, he offered his assistance.

Dr. Khurshid Guru is the Director of Robotic Surgery at the Roswell Park Cancer Institute in New York.

With the plane having an asthma inhaler for grown-ups just, Dr. Master was compelled to design a temporary nebulizer utilizing an oxygen tank, a plastic bottle and glass, and electrical tape. He snared the inhaler and the oxygen tank to the plastic bottle so that the kid could breathe in both at the same time. In under 60 minutes, the youngster started feeling better.

See in the interview below how Dr. Guru’s lifesaving device works: